Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Did the Law Council Australia and the NSW LPAB ignore ASIO advice in granting Zhu Minshen the right to grant LLB degrees, and entree into Australia's legal system?

by Ganesh Sahathevan



Hon George Brandis




AAP reported in November 2019:

Retired ASIO chief Duncan Lewis has accused the Chinese government of using 'insidious' foreign interference operations to 'take over' Australia's political system.
Anyone in political office could be a target, the former spy chief told the political journal Quarterly Essay in an interview to be published next week.
Mr Lewis claimed Chinese authorities were trying to 'place themselves in a position of advantage' by in political, social, business and media circles, The Sydney Morning Herald reported on Friday, citing the interview.

Despite that warning, the NSW LPAB renewed Zhu Minshen's  right to grant LLB degrees, and entree into Australia's legal system:



In fact, questions about Zhu Minshen were raised by the former Commonwealth Attorney General George Brandis as early as 2016:



Former AG George Brandis raised questions about Zhu Minshen and Top Education Group which remain unanswered, but Zhu and Top are today even more entrenched in the NSW and Australian legal system, thanks to the NSW LPAB and its chairman the CJ NSW, and the AG NSW


Despite all of the above, the Law Council Australia as well as NSW LPAB seem determined to continue supporting Zhu and Top Group:


Zhu Minshen's new Chinese website says the Law Council of Australia "officially approved" Top Education Instituter's application to issue law degrees


The NSW LPAB and Law Council Australia may  attempt  to deflect questions about all of the above by asserting that they are not required by law to seek the advice of ASIO when determining who may or many not grant law degrees in Australia. If they did, and even if the answer is legally correct, it would demonstrate poor judgment; entree into the legal system is always a matter of national security:

“....perhaps the only accredited degree program in Australia that counts agitating for a foreign power towards its qualifications": Why the Law Soc Australia & NSW LPAB's business with Zhu Minshen is a matter of national security


END 



















Retiring ASIO boss issues a chilling warning that China seeks to 'take over' Australia

  • Retired ASIO boss Duncan Lewis has warned of Chinese takeover of Australia
  • Mr Lewis has claimed Chinese authorities wanted to be in 'position of advantage'
  • His comments come after Liberal MPs were denied visas to travel to China 
Retired ASIO chief Duncan Lewis has accused the Chinese government of using 'insidious' foreign interference operations to 'take over' Australia's political system.
Anyone in political office could be a target, the former spy chief told the political journal Quarterly Essay in an interview to be published next week.
Mr Lewis claimed Chinese authorities were trying to 'place themselves in a position of advantage' by in political, social, business and media circles, The Sydney Morning Herald reported on Friday, citing the interview.
'Espionage and foreign interference is insidious. Its effects might not present for decades and by that time it's too late,' he said.
'You wake up one day and find decisions made in our country that are not in the interests of our country.'
In the interview, Mr Lewis warns covert foreign intrusion into the heart of Australian politics is 'something we need to be very, very careful about'.
His remarks come after Liberal MPs Andrew Hastie and Senator James Paterson were denied visas to travel to China for a study tour after they criticised its human rights recordIn an opinion piece published in The Australian on Thursday, senior Chinese diplomat Wang Xining accused the MPs of having double standards and showing disrespect.
'It is cynical that in a country boasting freedom of speech, different views from another nation are constantly and intentionally obliterated,' Mr Wang wrote.
In the interview, Mr Lewis warns covert foreign intrusion into the heart of Australian politics is 'something we need to be very, very careful about' (pictured is a reeducation centre in Xinjiang province)
In the interview, Mr Lewis warns covert foreign intrusion into the heart of Australian politics is 'something we need to be very, very careful about' (pictured is a reeducation centre in Xinjiang province)

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