Sunday, November 26, 2017

As MSA chairman Robert Kuok" without any consultation" changed MSA's insurance arrangements at a loss:Was Gerald Fernandez scapegoated for Kuok's dealings?


by Ganesh Sahathevan 



Image result for kuok MSA


Robert Kuok's memoirs continue to provide more data on Malaysian Chinese business practises.His rather candid views can now be compared against what has been written elsewhere, and the results can be intriguing.

An example is this account of how the Brits viewed Robert Kuok:
In 1969, Rober tKuok was made chairman of MSA,....the remaining British interests in the company became frustrated with his management style.The UK's High Commissioner, Sir Michael Walker, learned that although Kuok had practically no experience of airline business, he interfered in operational matter which were 'no concern of his'. An example was Kuok's decision, without any consultation, to change MSA's insurance arrangements.. This proved 'entirely unsuitable' and had to be reversed at a cost of M$500,000 (nearly£68,000).
(Source: Nicholas J.White,British Business in Post-Colonial Malaysia, 1957-70: Neo-colonialism or Disengagement?)


This can now be compared to how Kuok views the Brits,and himself,as recounted in his memoirs:

When I was chairman (of MSA), the managing director and CEO was David Craig, who came from British Airways. I had acrimonious exchanges with him. He tried very hard to ingratiate himself into the good books of the Malaysian directors, since the Singapore directors were very rigid and severe managers.

Whenever David wasn’t performing, they were severe, and so he ran to the Malaysian side for protection. He found the Malaysian directors by and large convenient pillars behind which he could hide. I tried to haul him out from hiding, and our relationship soured. One day, I was in the MSA office on Robinson Road in Singapore, which was a much grander office space than my own humble sugartrading cubbyhole. David spoke to me about engaging expensive European expatriates for the airline. I asked what was wrong with engaging pilots from Burma, which at that time, under the military regime of Ne Win, was training pilots and sending some of them to aeronautical schools in England. He retorted, “Oh, no, no. Only British pilots are safe.” I pointed out that some of our commanders here were Chinese from the Malay Peninsula. He responded that there were too few. Then I suggested he try Indonesia, since Garuda was a relatively seasoned airline. He responded, “Ah, these guys land their planes in the ocean and in jungles and kill all their passengers.” I rounded on him: “Aren’t you being racist?” I noted that a Qantas or British Airways plane piloted by whites had crashed in Singapore’s Kallang Basin Airport. We had a very rough exchange. He had his agenda. When I took the job, I had no agenda whatsoever. I just wanted harmony between Malaysia and Singapore.


The Brits were obviously less in awe of Kuok's abilities than many Malaysians are, but regardless of who one wants to believe, the matter of  "Kuok's decision, without any consultation, to change MSA's insurance arrangements (which ) proved  'entirely unsuitable' and had to be reversed at a cost of M$500,000 (nearly£68,000)" raises questions about the circumstances surrounding the conviction of Gerald Fernandez. As recounted recently on this blog,  Fernandez  was jailed for 21 months and fined S$5,000 9in 1971) for corruptly receiving S$5,000 in order to show favour to insurance brokers Edward Lumley in connection with MSA affairs (between 1968 and 1970,when Kuok was chairman).
The tension between the Brits and Kuok, and his interference in operational matters (clearly not the business of the chairman of the board) raises questions about the evidence against Fernandez,and whether he was scapegoated with regards Kuok's MSA insurance arrangements. 

END 

References 



Sunday, November 26, 2017


Kuok's MSA break-up story incomplete without Francis Seow's account of the contrived conviction of Gerald Fernandez,former MSA legal adviser

by Ganesh Sahathevan


Robert Kuok on his term as chairman, Malaysia-Sinagpore Airlines (1969-1971)

Dr Goh Keng Swee, Singapore’s deputy prime minister, asked if I would serve as chairman of Malaysia-Singapore Airlines (MSA). The Malaysian Government had proposed Dr Lim Swee Aun, the former Minister of Commerce and Industry, who had failed to get re-elected in the elections of May 1969. “We do not like him,” said Keng Swee. “But he’s not a bad fellow,” I replied. “Oh, never!” thundered Keng Swee. I said, “No, no. I’m overworked and underpaid by my own company.”


I was joking, though it was true that I hardly had a moment’s rest in those days. I told him I couldn’t take the job, because I didn’t have the time to do it justice and didn’t know the airline business. I don’t think anybody had talked to Singapore Government leaders like that. They were already known to be very fierce. As I walked towards the door, Keng Swee said, “Well, you know there are hardly any links left between Malaysia and Singapore. If you don’t want to serve, then this link will also go.” It was just like a scene in a Hollywood film. Two steps from the door, I wheeled around and asked, “Are you telling me that if I take the job, that link will be preserved?” “Yes.” Again, I felt I had no choice. “If I agree to take the job, what do I need to do?” “Simple things. First, go to see Tunku Abdul Rahman and [Deputy Prime Minister Abdul Razak Hussein] and tell them we gave you an indication that you’re acceptable to us.” “You mean I have to sell myself to my own leaders?” When he replied in the affirmative, I said, “Give me time to think about it. This is getting very sticky.”


(Tunku) didn’t sound too enthusiastic about my taking on this role. He made some remarks about the problems he was having with Singapore. I kept quiet, since it was not for me to say anything. Then I prodded him a bit. “Sir, do you mind if we come back to the subject?” In the end, he said, “OK, Kuok. If you want the job, take it. It doesn’t matter to me.” So I accepted the position of Chairman of MSA.

Meanwhile, the Singapore Government, which was very good with its abacus, was analysing the economics of the airline industry. They began to realise that the Malaysian domestic routes were profitmaking, but looking into the future, they could not see such air travel as big-scale business. The international airport in Singapore, and the international traffic, was really the jewel in the crown of the airline industry in the Malaysia/Singapore region. So the Singapore Government felt it would be useful to break Malaysia-Singapore Airlines into two and let each country go its own way. The Board meetings grew increasingly acrimonious.

I made an appointment to see Goh Keng Swee to appeal to him to hold back his aggressive Singapore directors. I hinted that the game was getting very one-sided. I was acting as referee, but I was seeing the poor Malaysian directors slaughtered at every meeting because the Singapore directors had minds as sharp as razors. In fairness, I must say the contribution to running the airline properly and efficiently came almost entirely from the Singapore side. The Malaysian side was too subjective and often allowed their feelings to influence their comments.








Then see the matter of Gerald Fernnandez (c 1969-1971),as related by former Attorney General Of Singapore.Francis Seow,in his book to
To Catch a Tartar: A Dissident in Lee Kuan Yew's Prison:


Shortly before I was due to leave the service, a Geoffrey Fernandez, the secretary and legal adviser to the Malaysian Singapore Airlines (MSA), a two-nation air carrier, whose head office and main operating station were based in Singapore, was brought back to Singapore, after lengthy extradition proceedings in England, charged with the offence of criminal breach of trust of a paltry sum of $5,000. His more heinous offence, which was carefully muted, was that he had translated national airline company politics into a dangerous game of international politics by pitting the two governments against one another. Banking heavily on his presumed friendship with Tungku Abdul Rahman Putra al-Haj, the prime minister of Malaysia, Malaysian cabinet ministers, and other high Malaysian dignitaries, he had waged an indiscreet campaign of malignity against the prime minister (Lee Kuan Yew) himself and impugned the integrity of his bosom friend, the MSA’s chairman and now Chief Justice of Singapore, Yong Pung How. J.B. Jeyaretnam, now in private law practice, was retained as his legal counsel and saw me regarding bail for his client. My immediate reaction was that it was an impudent request. For, when he was released in Malaysia on a personal cognisance as a member of the Malaysian bar, he had jumped bail, skipped out of the country using his brother’s passport to boot, and fled to Ireland. While on an ill advised sojourn to England, he was arrested. The offence was ordinarily bailable, but, for the antecedents and the prime minister’s personal interest in the matter, it would take more than a manful judge to grant him bail. In all the circumstances, it was difficult to accede to such a request for bail unless there were compelling grounds.I perused the investigation papers, and noted that the case against him was not as strong as I had thought. It turned on a single witness whose evidence, if successfully impugned, would leave the prosecution without a leg to stand on.
He was jailed for 21 months and fined S$5,000 for corruptly receiving S$5,000 in order to show favour to insurance brokers Edward Lumley in connection with MSA affairs.




Readers can decide for themselves who acted in Malaysia's interest.
END 
See also 

Surat Fernandez kpd Tengku pengarohi keputusan Mahkamah: MarshallBerita Harian, 12 February 1972, Page 10



Kuok's MSA break-up story incomplete without Francis Seow's account of the contrived conviction of Gerald Fernandez,former MSA legal adviser

by Ganesh Sahathevan


Robert Kuok on his term as chairman, Malaysia-Sinagpore Airlines (1969-1971)

Dr Goh Keng Swee, Singapore’s deputy prime minister, asked if I would serve as chairman of Malaysia-Singapore Airlines (MSA). The Malaysian Government had proposed Dr Lim Swee Aun, the former Minister of Commerce and Industry, who had failed to get re-elected in the elections of May 1969. “We do not like him,” said Keng Swee. “But he’s not a bad fellow,” I replied. “Oh, never!” thundered Keng Swee. I said, “No, no. I’m overworked and underpaid by my own company.”


I was joking, though it was true that I hardly had a moment’s rest in those days. I told him I couldn’t take the job, because I didn’t have the time to do it justice and didn’t know the airline business. I don’t think anybody had talked to Singapore Government leaders like that. They were already known to be very fierce. As I walked towards the door, Keng Swee said, “Well, you know there are hardly any links left between Malaysia and Singapore. If you don’t want to serve, then this link will also go.” It was just like a scene in a Hollywood film. Two steps from the door, I wheeled around and asked, “Are you telling me that if I take the job, that link will be preserved?” “Yes.” Again, I felt I had no choice. “If I agree to take the job, what do I need to do?” “Simple things. First, go to see Tunku Abdul Rahman and [Deputy Prime Minister Abdul Razak Hussein] and tell them we gave you an indication that you’re acceptable to us.” “You mean I have to sell myself to my own leaders?” When he replied in the affirmative, I said, “Give me time to think about it. This is getting very sticky.”


(Tunku) didn’t sound too enthusiastic about my taking on this role. He made some remarks about the problems he was having with Singapore. I kept quiet, since it was not for me to say anything. Then I prodded him a bit. “Sir, do you mind if we come back to the subject?” In the end, he said, “OK, Kuok. If you want the job, take it. It doesn’t matter to me.” So I accepted the position of Chairman of MSA.

Meanwhile, the Singapore Government, which was very good with its abacus, was analysing the economics of the airline industry. They began to realise that the Malaysian domestic routes were profitmaking, but looking into the future, they could not see such air travel as big-scale business. The international airport in Singapore, and the international traffic, was really the jewel in the crown of the airline industry in the Malaysia/Singapore region. So the Singapore Government felt it would be useful to break Malaysia-Singapore Airlines into two and let each country go its own way. The Board meetings grew increasingly acrimonious.

I made an appointment to see Goh Keng Swee to appeal to him to hold back his aggressive Singapore directors. I hinted that the game was getting very one-sided. I was acting as referee, but I was seeing the poor Malaysian directors slaughtered at every meeting because the Singapore directors had minds as sharp as razors. In fairness, I must say the contribution to running the airline properly and efficiently came almost entirely from the Singapore side. The Malaysian side was too subjective and often allowed their feelings to influence their comments.








Then see the matter of Gerald Fernnandez (c 1969-1971),as related by former Attorney General Of Singapore.Francis Seow,in his book to
To Catch a Tartar: A Dissident in Lee Kuan Yew's Prison:


Shortly before I was due to leave the service, a Geoffrey Fernandez, the secretary and legal adviser to the Malaysian Singapore Airlines (MSA), a two-nation air carrier, whose head office and main operating station were based in Singapore, was brought back to Singapore, after lengthy extradition proceedings in England, charged with the offence of criminal breach of trust of a paltry sum of $5,000. His more heinous offence, which was carefully muted, was that he had translated national airline company politics into a dangerous game of international politics by pitting the two governments against one another. Banking heavily on his presumed friendship with Tungku Abdul Rahman Putra al-Haj, the prime minister of Malaysia, Malaysian cabinet ministers, and other high Malaysian dignitaries, he had waged an indiscreet campaign of malignity against the prime minister (Lee Kuan Yew) himself and impugned the integrity of his bosom friend, the MSA’s chairman and now Chief Justice of Singapore, Yong Pung How. J.B. Jeyaretnam, now in private law practice, was retained as his legal counsel and saw me regarding bail for his client. My immediate reaction was that it was an impudent request. For, when he was released in Malaysia on a personal cognisance as a member of the Malaysian bar, he had jumped bail, skipped out of the country using his brother’s passport to boot, and fled to Ireland. While on an ill advised sojourn to England, he was arrested. The offence was ordinarily bailable, but, for the antecedents and the prime minister’s personal interest in the matter, it would take more than a manful judge to grant him bail. In all the circumstances, it was difficult to accede to such a request for bail unless there were compelling grounds.I perused the investigation papers, and noted that the case against him was not as strong as I had thought. It turned on a single witness whose evidence, if successfully impugned, would leave the prosecution without a leg to stand on.
He was jailed for 21 months and fined S$5,000 for corruptly receiving S$5,000 in order to show favour to insurance brokers Edward Lumley in connection with MSA affairs.




Readers can decide for themselves who acted in Malaysia's interest.
END 
See also 

Surat Fernandez kpd Tengku pengarohi keputusan Mahkamah: MarshallBerita Harian, 12 February 1972, Page 10

The Beginnings of Crony Capitalism-1955-1970: An academic take on Robert Kuok and cronyism

by Ganesh Sahathevan 

Robert-Kuok_book_600


From Kuok's memoirs:
“Cronies are lapdogs who polish a leader’s ego. In return, the leader hands out national favours to them.“A nation’s assets, projects and businesses should never be for anyone to hand out, neither for a king nor a prime minister.“A true leader is the chief trustee of a nation,” Kuok writes in his book, alluding to allegations of cronyism linked to the nation’s leaders over the past few decades.He added that any good leader could also rely on their fiduciary sense to set them on the right course, if the nation lacks an established system to guide its leaders.“A leader who practices cronyism justifies his actions by saying he wants to bring up the nation quickly in his lifetime, so the end justifies the means.“He abandons all the General Orders, that is the civil-service work manual that lays down tendering rules for state projects.“Instead, he simply hands the projects to a Chinese or to a Malay crony,” Kuok said, adding that government-owned banks are also forced to lend to the projects.“Some of these cronies may even be fronting for crooked officials.”


On the other, hand this, extracted from The Beginnings of Crony Capitalism: 
Business, Politics and Economic   Development in Malaysia, c.1955–70 by Nicholas  J. White:1



The enigmatic Robert Kuok was the entrepreneurial success story of the Tunku years—by the late-
1960s, he had developed vast financial interests in Malaysia, originally in the food industry
but extending also to timber, hotels and property development. Case studies by  omez and Rajeswary Brown illustrate that Kuok relied on close ties to the Malay elite, long before the NEP, to secure
pioneer status for his sugar refining and flour milling ventures. He was awarded these concessions despite that the Federation's tax holidays and tariff protection to encourage ISI tended to benefit British multinational enterprises, and notwithstanding the concern amongst Malay leaders that the grant of pioneer certificates to ethnic Chinese would only exacerbate the economic divide between Malay and non-Malay Malaysians. Additionally, Kuok secured nearly 15, 000 acres of land in Perlis to grow sugar cane during the 1960s—again, in a period when the federal government, as Gomez notes, was 'alreadyunder some pressure from UMNO members to augment state intervention
in the economy to promote Malay economic interests'.

For Brown, Kuok's 'oligopolistic niches in sugar and flour milling provided a secure capital base for diversification' of his empire into property and hotels. As Gomez also claims, 'Kuok's close links with
government leaders' smoothed the path for his appointment to the chairs of enterprises with a strong government equity participation—in the late-1960s, Kuok became head of both Malaysia Singapore

Airlines (MSA) and the Malaysian International Shipping Corporation (MISC). He additionally became a director of the national trading corporation, PERNAS and the Bank Bumiputera—two government backed institutions specifically designed to enhance the Malay share in the Malaysian economy.

END

Saturday, November 25, 2017

Najib ally Hadi Awang accuses Saudis of siding with Zionist and infidels against Islam: Malaysia siding with Qatar becoming more evident ,1MDB theft directing Malaysia's foreign policy

by Ganesh Sahathevan



Hadi Awang says Arab nations were becoming timid in front of infidels but behaved harshly against believers, while glorifying Zionists above their brethren. – The Malaysian Insight file pic, November 25, 2017.



First see

Malaysia drawing closer to Qatar ,and the Muslim Brotherhood, against Suadi Arabia.;refuses to act against Najib ally and IUMS member Hadi Awang








And now this:


Hadi skewers Arab nations after ulama group labelled as terrorists



THE Arab civilisation is crumbling, said PAS president Abdul Hadi Awang, days after a global ulama association that he is a part of was branded a terrorist group by Saudi Arabia.
Hadi, who in the past was accused of labelling his Malay-Muslim political rivals as infidels, today criticised certain Arab countries for “punishing other Muslims”.
“They heavily punish countries with whom they share a common religion simply because of differing opinions,” Hadi said in a statement.
He did not mention Saudi Arabia or the bloc of Gulf nations currently allied to it, but there is little doubt who he was referring to.
On Friday, the Saudi government declared the International Union of Muslim Scholars (IUMS), and the International Islamic Council ‘Massaa' as terrorist groups.
Hadi is vice-president of IUMS, a group that claims to have connections with more than 90,000 Muslim scholars worldwide and which aims to heal divisions between Sunni and Shia Muslims.
IUMS is based in Qatar, a Gulf country that has been ostracised by a Saudi-led quartet comprising Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt.
Global affairs analysts have said Saudi Arabia’s efforts to isolate Qatar, its meddling in the Syrian civil war and its war in Yemen were part of a larger campaign to check Iran’s growing influence in the Middle East.
Eleven individuals were also placed on the quartet’s terror list for disseminating and supporting terrorism. Hadi was not one of the 11.
Hadi said he was not surprised by the new terrorist list as it came from countries that had severed ties with Qatar.
“These are the same countries that are pursuing normalisation of relations with Israel and countries within the Mason - International Zionist network,” Hadi wrote in today’s statement.
They no longer have the will to act independently and righteously amid their failure to learn from their own long history of tyranny.”  
Hadi has criticised Saudi Arabia’s increasingly friendly relations with Israel, a country widely vilified by Malay Muslims.
“They shif stances to fit their desires, becoming timid in front of infidels but behaving harshly against the believers, all the while glorifying their Zionist guests above their fellow brethren,” Hadi said.
“To make things worse, they heavily punish countries with whom they share a common religion simply because of differing opinions”.
“The Arab civilisation was respected because of Islam but is now crumbling under the weight of its own crimes by recognising the Zionist regime and neglecting Palestine and its rights.” – November 25, 2017





Friday, November 24, 2017

Malaysia drawing closer to Qatar ,and the Muslim Brotherhood, against Suadi Arabia.;refuses to act against Najib ally and IUMS member Hadi Awang

by Ganesh Sahathevan

"Innocent Owner" Riza Aziz Attended Yacht Meeting Before Good Star Heist - EXCLUSIVE
Najib and Prince Turki Al-Saud who remains under detention by order
of Crown Prince Mohamad Bin Salman.





Malaysia seems to be drawing closer to Qatar ,and the Muslim Brotherhood, against Saudi Arabia.

Previously reported on this blog:
Malaysian Government tries to distance itself from Crown Prince MBS,hints at closer ties with Qatar- _1MDB Saudi "donation " story likely factor
Now, in addition to the complications arising from the 1MDB theft,is the membership of PM Najib Razak's political ally Ustaz Hadi Awang's membership of the Yusof Qaradawi led International Union Of Muslim Scholars (IUMS), which has just  been declared a terrorist organisation by the Saudis. Some, including this writer, would argue that the designation has been a long time coming.

Meanwhile, Najib and his Government, and Hadi,seem unwilling to take any steps to severe ties with the IUMS, further signalling  closer ties with Qatar.
END 









Global ulama group linked to 

Hadi accused of terrorism, says 

report

 
Published on 23 Nov 2017 6:20PM ·


A scholarly group in which PAS president Abdul Hadi Awang
is vice-president has been declared a terror group by Saudi
Arabia, Egypt, United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain.
– The Malaysian Insight file pic, November 23, 2017.
A SCHOLARLY group in which PAS president Abdul Hadi Awang is a top leader has been declared a terror group by the Anti-Terror Quarter of Saudi Arabia, Egypt, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, Arab News reported.
The International Union of Muslim Scholars (IUMS), where Hadi is vice-president, was declared a terror group along with International Islamic Council ‘Massaa'.
Eleven individuals were also placed on the quartet’s terror list for disseminating and supporting terrorism.
The four countries announced this today in a statement released through the Saudi Press Agency.
“The two listed entities are terrorist organizations working to promote terrorism through the exploitation of Islamic discourse and its use as a cover to facilitate various terrorist activities,” the quartet said.
IUMS was founded in 2004 and is headed by Sheikh Youssef al-Qaradawi, a controversial figure who has been banned from entering the US for his alleged extremist views, which the Egypt-born theologian has denied.
IUMS members are said to be followers of the Muslim Brotherhood, which played a leading role in the Arab Spring protests. Members include scholars from the different denominations in Islam and the union’s stated aim is to promote dialogue between Muslim scholars.
The 11 individuals placed on the quartet’s terror list were identified as Khaled Nazem Diab, Salem Jaber Omar Ali Sultan Fathallah Jaber, Moyasar Ali Musa Abdullah Jubouri, Mohammed Ali Saeed Atm, Hassan Ali Mohammed Juma Sultan, Mohammed Suleiman Haidar Mohammed Al-Haydar, Mohammed Jamal Ahmed Hishmat Abdul Hamid, Alsayed Mahmoud Ezzat Ibrahim Eissa, Yahya Alsayed Ibrahim Mohamed Moussa, Qadri Mohamed Fahmy Mahmoud Al-Sheikh and Alaa Ali Ali Mohammed Al-Samahi.
The quartet, countries allied together against Qatar, repeated its condemnation of the latter in aiding terrorism.
“The (11) individuals also have carried out various terrorist operations in which they have received direct Qatari support at various levels, including providing them with passports and assigning them to Qatari institutions with a charitable appearance to facilitate their movement,” the statement said.
Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain severed ties with Qatar on June 4, accusing it of supporting terrorism. – November 23, 2017.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Asian silence complicates Penny Wong's foreign affairs duties :Malaysia uses Australia's "Imams' Panel" discussion to make clear SSM is not acceptable

by Ganesh Sahathevan

While it has been reported that there was " Pride and jubilation worldwide as Australia backs same-sex marriage" Asia,and in particular countries in this region, have remained silent.


Of course, Australia is a sovereign country and will do what is in Australia's national interest.However, there is an obvious problem when one of the most high profile champions of the cause, Penelope Wong Ying Yen, is also the 
 Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs. The  problem is further compounded by Australia's desire to morph into an Asian rather than Western nation.


Penny Wong breaks down in tears as she hears same-sex marriage result

As an indication of things to come, a Malaysian government linked website has referred to an Australian panel of imams discussion to make the point that same sex marriage is against their country's norms.


END 

Reference 

A video by OnePath Network today has shed light to that very thought of those who asked ‘Should Muslims ever support gay marriage?’.
The panel of Australian leading imams had discussed the topic in ‘The Imams Panel’, which involved one imam revealing that Muslims should never discriminate against anyone should they wish to commit same-sex marriage.
“Whoever wants to do whatever, there's the freedom of the country or whatever. But as Muslim, Islam categorically says that it is Haram (prohibited), it is very clear in the Quran in the Sunnah),” says Mufti Zeeyad Ravat from Pillars of Guidance Community Centre (PGCC) in Melbourne.
He adds that if a person chooses same-sex marriage, “We cannot discriminate against him”, though it is an Islamic scholar’s duty to tell them off that it is not correct and it is ultimately up to the individual to repent to God.
“If we say ‘Okay it’s fine in legalising it’ then we are guilty of changing the Shariah (rulings) of Allah,” he advised while further stating Muslims must be firm in their stance as it reflects on the integrity of Islam.
On the LGBT community, Zeeyad shared, “We need to deal with it, we can’t say they are dirty people and push them aside, they need counselling and some love, and with some help they get over it.
“But if we are going to demonise them, they are going to go deeper and more people are going to follow them,” he pointed out.
While Sheikh Dr. Kamal Taleb from Roselands Masjid shared, “Islam is a religion of truth. It advocates truth and justice. If something is wrong, it won’t stand with wrong.
“With LGBT community, we’ll stand with them if they advocate justice, that which is truth and beneficial and not harmful.
“From an Islamic perspective it is wrong, Islamically speaking. Not only Islam but before Islam...in heavenly religions… It's not the norm as some people may think,” he said, adding that LGBT behaviour can be manifested in a proper manner or controlled, but not in the wrong manner.
Sheikh Abu Zoud from Sunnah Foundation, on the other hand reminds, “As a Muslim one is supposed to go back to his book of guidance (Quran), the story of Prophet Lut (AS),” whose people had engaged in homosexual acts.
Lut AS had faithfully preached and warned his people while emphasising the error: "Do you commit immorality while you are seeing? Do you indeed approach men with desire instead of women? Rather, you are a people behaving ignorantly.” (Qur’an 27:54-55)
Hence Abu Zoud affirmed, “Muslims stance on this is always ‘NO’… always Islam would teach against them (LGBT), so that's what we should be teaching,” he emphasised on the importance of educating the younger generation the right thing.

Australian Defence Minister in charge of submarines compromised by allegations about his sexual activities : What intel has he been forced to make available to foreign parties?

by Ganesh Sahathevan
















Christopher Pyne,the Australian minister in charge of the DCNS/Naval Group Australian submarine project has become the target of allegations concerning his sexual activities.  
While these allegations have only just been brought to the attention of the Australian  public the matter of Pyne's sexual activities are believed to have been known at least in government circles for at least the past decade.

While Australia's political reporters (dubbed the Canberra Press Gallery) have decided to keep the matter hidden from public view it cannot then be assumed that Pyne has not been the subject of surveillance ,and consequently compromised, by any number of foreign intelligence agencies. The media's determination to keep matters quite would have made their jobs that much easier. 

The matter of Pyne's sexual activities became public after his Twitter account was hacked. As Defence Industry Minister, Mr Pyne usually uses his Twitter account to discuss military hardware or sometimes to promote his media appearances.
That he has been compromised must be assumed. 
END 

END 

Did Goldman Sachs SSG Unit house fraudulently under priced 1MDB bonds? Does this explain Turnbull's refusal to investigate ANZ/AMBank

by Ganesh Sahathevan




Malcolm Turnbull when he was chairman at Goldman Sachs. Now he runs the country.
Malcolm Turnbull when he was chairman at Goldman Sachs. Now he runs the country. 



First ,from Zerohedge, quoting Bloomberg:


Alex Turnbull, a former executive director of Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s special situations group, is planning a Singapore-based hedge fund, said people with knowledge of the matter.
 Turnbull, son of Australian Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull, will be the chief investment officer of Keshik Capital Pte, said the people who asked not to be identified as the information is private. The fund, which will be focused on Asia with the flexibility to invest globally, may start as early as January and will invest in equity and credit, including convertible bonds, they added.

Keshik is at least the third hedge-fund startup tapping Asian opportunities in recent years involving a former member of the Goldman Sachs unit that invests in distressed debt and companies with its own capital. The Special Situations Group, known as SSG, is part of Goldman Sachs’s investing and lending operation, which generated $4.3 billion of pretax earnings last year(2013), the most of the New York-based bank’s four business segments.
 His reward: starting "his" own hedge fund, Keshik Capital, at the ripe old age of about 31, not even a decade out of college.

Now see :
The Wall Street bank helped 1MDB, which was founded by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak in September 2009, raise $6.5 billion in three bond sales in 2012 and 2013 to invest in energy projects and real estate to boost the Malaysian economy. 
.

Then  see, from the NY Times:

Jack Blum, a lawyer who led corruption investigations for several Senate committees, said that Goldman should have done a thorough investigation of what 1MDB was doing with the money that the bank helped it raise and move around the world, especially given the history of corruption in Malaysia.
“It is a very serious problem when a company is making a hell of a lot of money out of something and everybody in the place says, ‘I don’t know about it,’” Mr. Blum said.
Mr. Blum said that assigning legal blame in situations like the 1MDB case was generally hard because it would be difficult to prove that Goldman executives knew what was going to happen with the money before it happened.

END

Reference

Goldman Sachs's Lloyd Blankfein & Tim Liessner: Which is the greater sin, writing a reference for employment at a competitor ,or knowingly buying sovereigns as junk?



Goldman Sachs alumnus Malcolm Turnbull runs the country; others the US Treasury